Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Mrs Murphy's Visit to Uganda

2KM and 2KJ know a great teacher called Mrs Murphy. Mrs Murphy sometimes fills in if Miss Jordan or Miss McGeady is away.

Around five years ago Mrs Murphy visited Uganda for about a month. Her sister was studying international law at a university at Kampala and Mrs Murphy went to Uganda to visit her sister and learn more about this fascinating country.

They stayed with a family called the Senindes. Rose Seninde, the mum, was a school principal. Mrs Murphy got to visit lots of schools in Uganda.

Mrs Murphy put this video slideshow together to share her Ugandan trip with all of us!

Mrs Murphy's Time in Uganda on PhotoPeach




Leave a comment.

What did you find interesting about the slideshow?

Do you have any questions for Mrs Murphy?


21 comments:

Iman said...

Dear Mrs. Murphy,

I loved the pictures of Uganda because I think it really helps us visulise what the children look like in the school that we are helping (if that is them). I have some questions,

Where were you in Uganda?

Did you eat any new types of food?


Was it hot?

From,
Im★n

Linda Yollis said...

Dear Mrs. Murphy,

Thank you for sharing your experience visiting Uganda.

It was amusing to me that when you waved to say goodbye...the children thought you meant come here! It is fun to learn about different customs from other countries! :-)

How long did your sister study at the university in Kampala? Does she keep in touch with the Senindes family?

Did you do much travel in Africa?

Thanks again!
Mrs. Y♥llis

Anonymous said...

Dear Mrs. Murphy,
That video was great. It was very interesting to see so many Ugandan students. I learned that if you're going to boarding school you have to shave you're head to make sure you don't have lice. Also I learned that they say hello differently so if you wave at them then all of the students gather around you.


I wish I could go to Uganda.




From,
Miriam(In Mrs. Yollis' class)

Aidan said...

Dear Mrs.Murphy

I loved your video!! It was stunning. I have some questions for you:

How many schools did you visit? What schools did you visit?

How old were the children?

Did you get to teach or speak at the schools?

All the best,
Aidan

Jaden said...

Dear Mrs. Murphy,

I would love to visit Uganda. I found two things interesting.

1. They put a show on just for you.

2. Waving meant come here.

What is secondary school in Uganda?

Best Regards,
Jaden★

Jie Ling said...

Dear Mrs. Murphy,

Your video was amazing!
All of the pictures were great.

I have a few questions for you.

Where did you stay in Uganda?
Did you eat lots porridge?
Was there clean water?

Best Wishes,
Jie Ling
Team Toa

Claire said...

Dear Mrs. Murphy,
It is very cool that you went to Uganda. Did you see Kampala? How do the houses look like? Was the ceiling tall enough for you to stand? Did you bring the poker cards or did they have it? Well I never went to Uganda.
I want to go.
From,
Claire
Team Toa

Amanda said...

Dear Mrs. Murphy
It looks like you are really having fun in Uganda. Did you play any traditional games about Uganda?

From
Amanda

Team Toa

Mr. Salsich said...

Dear Mrs. Murphy,

Thanks for sharing your Uganda experience with us. A lot of my students were wondering why most of the children had such short hair, and you answered that for us.

I especially liked the photo of the dance performance that they put on for you. It was also great to see how much fun you had playing with your "brothers."

I know you have lots of questions already, but I was wondering what grains they used to make the porridge.

Thanks for sharing your amazing slideshow!

From,
Mr. Salsich

Aine said...

Hello everyone! I love all the interest your project has raised in Uganda. It is truly an amazing country full of beautiful people. I will try to answer everyone's questions here.

@Iman, we were staying in a little village outside of Kampala. And YES I did eat lots of new types of food, my favourite was a peanut vegetable stew that was gorgeous. We chewed on raw sugar cane (kid's fave treat), and ate lots of amazing fruits. We cooked a lot outside and she used to roll out these amazing flatbreads with glass coke bottles... when I can't find a rolling pin I always remember Rose's coke bottle!! And yes it was quite hot.

@ Mrs Yollis, I love learning about different customs and what things mean in different countries as well. My sister was in Kampala for 2 terms. And I only traveled in Uganda sadly... but we went near the Congo on Safari and saw lots of amazing animals and waterfalls. My sister has traveled to Malawi as well. And thanks to Facebook we are back in touch with the Seninde family which is great because the post is unreliable in Uganda and a lot of our letters and parcels did not make it to them. I have just gotten Rose's email address and can't wait to email her.

@Miriam, I hope you get to Uganda some day, you will love it.

@Aidan, we visited about 5 schools because we were also visiting all the children from the Seninde family who were in different schools. Most the schools we visited were primary schools so young children, but one of the brothers and sisters in our family was in secondary school so we got to visit there as well.

@Jaden, Yes it was amazing to have a show put on just for us! We felt special. Secondary school is high school. Have I answered your question?

@ Jie Ling, We stayed with the Seninde family outside of Kampala in their house. We did eat a lot of porridge type food. And at school the students get a lot of porridge type meals too. We bought a lot of bottled water and boiled our own water when we were at the house as it was safer for us to do that because our bodies would not be used to their water. Very good questions!!

@Claire, Yes I spent a lot of time in Kampala. There are a lot of amazing markets in Kampala selling everything from shoes to fruit! There are a lot of different types of houses. The house we stayed in was very modern and normal to what we would see in Australia. But it just does not have all the luxuries like toilets, showers, and washing machines that we would be used to. Then there were small wooden shack type houses. We even stayed in mud and straw huts when we went on safari that were amazing. And I was able to stand in all of the houses! I think my sister brought the deck of cards, but they taught us games and we taught them games too.

@ Amanda, I learned the Che Che Koolay song that I saw on your blog. But other than that I didn't learn any other games while I was there. We saw lots of dancing and singing though.

Thanks for all the GREAT questions. I will try to respond as best I can, but I have a new baby in the house and sometimes they can be quite demanding ;)
Mrs Murphy

Mrs Murphy said...

...

@Aidan, we visited about 5 schools because we were also visiting all the children from the Seninde family who were in different schools. Most the schools we visited were primary schools so young children, but one of the brothers and sisters in our family was in secondary school so we got to visit there as well.

@Jaden, Yes it was amazing to have a show put on just for us! We felt special. Secondary school is high school. Have I answered your question?

@ Jie Ling, We stayed with the Seninde family outside of Kampala in their house. We did eat a lot of porridge type food. And at school the students get a lot of porridge type meals too. We bought a lot of bottled water and boiled our own water when we were at the house as it was safer for us to do that because our bodies would not be used to their water. Very good questions!!

@Claire, Yes I spent a lot of time in Kampala. There are a lot of amazing markets in Kampala selling everything from shoes to fruit! There are a lot of different types of houses. The house we stayed in was very modern and normal to what we would see in Australia. But it just does not have all the luxuries like toilets, showers, and washing machines that we would be used to. Then there were small wooden shack type houses. We even stayed in mud and straw huts when we went on safari that were amazing. And I was able to stand in all of the houses! I think my sister brought the deck of cards, but they taught us games and we taught them games too.

@ Amanda, I learned the Che Che Koolay song that I saw on your blog. But other than that I didn't learn any other games while I was there. We saw lots of dancing and singing though.

Thanks for all the GREAT questions. I will try to respond as best I can, but I have a new baby in the house and sometimes they can be quite demanding ;)
Mrs Murphy

Mrs Murphy said...

Dear Mr Salsich,

I am glad that the slideshow was interesting for you and your class. They Ugandan people are very outgoing and generous and treated us very well.

I wish I could remember what grains they made the porridge out of... I will consult with one of my "brothers" and get back to you.

Mrs Murphy

Mrs Murphy said...

@ Mr Salsich, Iman and Jie Ling...

My sister helped me to remember the porridge. It is called matoke - It is a species of banana that they boil up when it is unripe. Served with a ground peanut sauce called g- nut sauce.

Hope that helps.
Mrs Murphhy

Ryan said...

Dear Mrs. Murphy,

I loved the pictures of Ugandan because it really showed me how exciting Uganda is! I loved the music. It must take a lot of practice to learn those dances. Could you do those dances?

From,
Ryan

Anonymous said...

Dear Mrs Murphy,
I like the sideshow.You have too many question so I should't ask one.
From Marcus

Anonymous said...

Dear Mrs. Murphy,


I liked reading what you did when you were in Uganda. I hope you had a good time when you were in Uganda.


From Seth

Heath said...

Dear Mrs Murphy,

Was it fun over in Uganda?
What was your favourite part?

by for now from,
Heath

Mrs Murphy said...

Dear all, I love getting all your comments, it makes be remember how incredibly lucky I was to have such an amazing opportunity in my life!

@Ryan- We loved watching the dancing and yes they did teach us a little, but really we left it to the professionals.

@Seth and Heath, yes I had a fantastic time. And what a great question you asked Heath... My favourite part was by far the people and their beautiful spirit and outlook on life. I learned a lot from them!

Kindest regards,
Mrs Murphy

Anonymous said...

Dear Mrs. Murphy,

We love the pictures of Uganda. It is amazing how you went to Uganda and went to a school that sang for you! It is fascinating that the children in the Ugandan school had to shave their heads because they did not want to get head lice.

At our school we have head lice, but we just call it lice. In fact, it is going around right now! :-(

What did you think when you saw the
school?

Warmly,

Gr⎭ce
Alex⎭

Alexa,Ben and Aaron said...

Dear Mrs.Murphy,

That slide show was amazing! I loved the pictures about the video because
the pictures were great and the music was cool.

I have a question for you:
Were the Uganda kids shy?

Warmly,
Ben and Aaron

Mrs Murphy said...

So sorry for the delay in getting back to ye....

@ Grace and Alex... I saw a range of schools from boarding schools to local schools so there was quite a difference in them. In general though children do not take education for granted and so were all VERY pleased and grateful to be in school, so it made for a very happy atmosphere in all the places I visited. Great question.

@ Ben and Aaron, another great question! Ugandan children were NEVER shy of the camera, they loved pictures being taken. Cameras are not as common as they are in Australia. In fact, when we were there, Rose wanted a picture of us, so she had to book a man to come from Kampala and take a photo and then deliver the photo a few weeks later. We each got a copy and I treasure it to this day. Back to your question... Ugandan children are beautifully polite and well mannered, and I suppose a bit shy like any other child in the world until they get to know the person.

 
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